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Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

3 edition of Water harvesting and supplemental irrigation for improved water use efficiency in dry areas found in the catalog.

Water harvesting and supplemental irrigation for improved water use efficiency in dry areas

Theib Oweis

Water harvesting and supplemental irrigation for improved water use efficiency in dry areas

by Theib Oweis

  • 284 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by International Water Management Institute in Colombo, Sri Lanka .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementTheib Oweis, Ahmed Hachum and Jacob Kijne.
SeriesSWIM Paper -- 7
ContributionsHachum, Ahmed., Kijne, Jacob., International Water Management Institute., System-Wide Initiative on Water Management.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22588071M
ISBN 109290903783

Dry areas suffer not only from limited rainfall but also ‘natural leakage’—90% of rainwater is lost directly or indirectly, and is unavailable for agriculture or domestic use. Water harvesting is a low-cost, easy-to-use, environmentally-friendly way to recover a large part of this lost water. Rainwater harvesting captures, diverts, and stores rainwater from rooftops for later use. Typical uses of rainwater include landscape irrigation, wash applications, ornamental pond and fountain filling, cooling tower make-up water, and toilet and urinal flushing. With additional filtration and disinfection.

Rainwater Harvesting for Agriculture in the Dry Areas - Kindle edition by Oweis, Theib Y., Prinz, Dieter, Hachum, Ahmed Y.. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Rainwater Harvesting for Agriculture in the Dry : $ T. Oweis is the director of the Integrated Water and Land Management Program (IWLMP) at the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) (CGIAR Future Harvest Center). He has carried out research into and published extensively on irrigation and water management since the s, fulfilling numerous academic and institutional roles over : $

Under improved management, an average increase of 50% in total production can be achieved with a single supplemental irrigation. Water harvesting and supplemental irrigation are economically viable at the national level. Net benefits improved by about threefold for Cited by: Water harvesting and supplemental irrigation for improved water use efficiency in dry areas By T. Oweis, A. Hachum and J. Kijne Get PDF ( KB)Author: T. Oweis, A. Hachum and J. Kijne.


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Water harvesting and supplemental irrigation for improved water use efficiency in dry areas by Theib Oweis Download PDF EPUB FB2

Water Harvesting and Supplemental Irrigation for Improved Water Use Efficiency in Dry Areas Article (PDF Available) January with Reads How we measure 'reads'. Water harvesting and supplemental irrigation for improved water-use efficiency in dry areas Conference Paper (PDF Available) January with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

This paper aims to describe the state of theart of both water harvesting (WH) andsupplemental irrigation (SI) techniques in the temperate and sub-tropical dry lands, especiallyin the countries of WANA that are characterized by a Mediterranean-type climate. In addition,three case studies of water harvesting are presented (see annex).Cited by: Oweis, T.

& Hachum, A. & Kijne, J., "Water harvesting and supplemental irrigation for improved water use efficiency in dry areas," IWMI Books, Reports H Water Harvesting and Supplemental Irrigation for Improved Water Productivity of Dry Farming Systems in West Asia and North Africa Conference Paper (PDF Available) in Agricultural Water.

TAC designated IWMI, the lead CGIAR institute for research on irrigation and water management, as the convening center for the System-Wide Initiative on Water Management (SWIM). Improving water management requires dealing with a range of policy, institutional, and technical issues.

Water harvesting and supplemental irrigation for improved water use efficiency in dry areas. Citation: Oweis, T.; Hachum, A.; Kijne, J. Water harvesting and supplemental irrigation for improved water use efficiency in dry areas.

Colombo, Sri. Water Harvesting and Supplemental Irrigation for Improved Water Use Efficiency in Dry Areas, International Water Management Institute, Colombo, Sri Lanka () Google Scholar Poesen et Cited by: While the water shortage in this region is severe, irrigation water use efficiency is only about 40%, with a typical agricultural water use efficiency of about kg m −3.

Excessive irrigation in Ningxia and Inner Mongolia has had a significant influence on downstream water users along the Yellow by: The lesser soil evaporation in mulched fields would facilitate higher water use efficiency and yield in a dry year. This indicated that there was a significantly higher loss of water from soil in non-mulched fields and subsequently less water was available for crop use in the growing season.

Xie et by:   Oweis T, Hachum A, Kijne J () Water harvesting and supplemental irrigation for improved water use efficiency in the dry areas.

SWIM paper 7. International Water Management Institute, Colombo Google ScholarCited by: 2. Improve water use efficiency There is still ample scope for water use efficiency improvements (getting more yields per cubic metre of water) and reducing the risk of causing diffuse pollution through over-irrigating by improving the farm irrigation system.

One way of doing so is implementing a drip irrigation system which enhances irrigation File Size: 83KB. Supplemental irrigation (SI) is a highly efficient practice with great potential for increasing agricultural production and improving livelihoods in the dry rainfed areas.

In the drier environments, most of the rainwater is lost by evaporation; therefore the rainwater productivity is extremely low.

Water conservation, including water harvesting and management of green water (moisture from rain held in soils), is a key strategy for coping with water scarcity and variability in agriculture.

More efficient irrigation practices must be adopted. Supplemental irrigation is an option with high potential for increasing water productivity in rainfed areas. Scarce water, now used for full irrigation, could be reallocated to supplement dry farming for improved water by: Water harvesting in its broadest sense can be defined as the "collection of runoff for its productive use".

Runoff may be harvested from roofs and ground surfaces as well as from intermittent or ephemeral watercourses. Water harvesting techniques, which harvest.

Water Harvesting for Improved Agricultural Production. Conference: Marginal Water Management for Sustainable Irrigated Agriculture in Dry Areas: Advanced Short Course Marginal Water Management for Sustainable Irrigated Agriculture in Dry Areas.

24 Oct - Author: Theib Oweis. Improving water-use efficiency. In general, the term efficiency is used to quantify the relative output obtainable from a given input. Referring to the use of water in irrigation, efficiency may be defined in various ways, depending on the nature of the inputs and outputs to be considered.

In the dry areas, water, not land, is the most limiting resource for improved agricultural production. Maximizing water productivity, and not yield per unit of land, is therefore a better strategy for dry farming systems. Under such conditions, more efficient water management techniques must be.

Sharing best practices for improved Agricultural Water Management using project findings from seven thematic areas: water productivity, water efficiency, water harvesting, conjunctive use of surface and groundwater, technology, water accounting and solar energy for irrigation.

Depending on the efficiency of the RWH technique, ARWH can be used either to enhance soil moisture content mainly in rainfed areas (e.g., the use of terraces) or as a source of water for supplementary irrigation when there is a shortage of agricultural water supply (e.g., the use of small dams to collect runoff) [24,35].

Accordingly."Water harvesting and supplemental irrigation for improved water productivity of dry farming systems in West Asia and North Africa," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol.

.Theme 3: Water Harvesting Improving Agriculture Water Management (AWM) is a key approach to improve water use efficiency and productivity within rain-fed agriculture Definitions of WH: “The process of concentrating precipitation through runoff and storing it for beneficial use” (Oweis et al., )File Size: 4MB.