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2 edition of meanings of the specifying genitive in English found in the catalog.

meanings of the specifying genitive in English

Frank Durieux

meanings of the specifying genitive in English

a cognitive analysis

by Frank Durieux

  • 324 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by Universiteit Antwerpen, Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Departement Germaanse, Afdeling Linguïstiek in [Wilrijk, Belgium] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • English language -- Case.,
  • English language -- Syntax.,
  • English language -- Possessives.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 93-94).

    StatementFrank Durieux.
    SeriesAntwerp papers in linguistics ;, 66, Antwerp papers in linguistics ;, nr. 66.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPE1369 .D86 1990
    The Physical Object
    Pagination94 p. ;
    Number of Pages94
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL1610793M
    LC Control Number91150182

    In grammar, the genitive case, also called the second case, is the grammatical case that marks a word, usually a noun, as modifying another word, also usually a noun—thus, indicating an attributive relationship of one noun to the other noun.A genitive can also serve purposes indicating other relationships. For example, some verbs may feature arguments in the genitive case; and the genitive.   It is expressed in English either by the s-genitive (Mary's books, the girls' books) or by the of-genitive (the title of the book, the lady of the house). The genitive can also denote a part-whole relationship (the eye of the needle, the days of the week, the heart of .

    Author Rosenbach, Anette Subjects English language - Case.; Englisch.; English language - Possessives. Audience Specialized Contents. The structure of the s-genitive and the of-genitive: some theoretical preliminaries.   Different from is the standard phrase. Most scholars obstinately avoid different than, especially in simple comparisons, such as You are different from me.. However, some of the experts are more tolerant of different than, pointing out that the phrase has been in use for centuries, and has been written by numerous accomplished m ore-liberal linguists point out that a sentence.

    Lesson 6 - Postpositives, Personal Pronouns, Uses of αὐτός, Direct Objects in Cases Other than the Accusative Postpositives: Words that often begin a clause when translated into English, but never begin a clause in Greek are called postpositives.A postpositive is positioned (posited) after (post) other words in . 1 My child, # tn Heb “my son” (likewise in vv. 3, 20). if you have made a pledge # sn It was fairly common for people to put up some kind of financial security for someone else, that is, to underwrite another’s debts. But the pledge in view here was foolish because the debtor was a neighbor who was not well known (זָר, zar), perhaps a misfit in the community.


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Meanings of the specifying genitive in English by Frank Durieux Download PDF EPUB FB2

Attributive Genitive - (Sometimes called the Descriptive Genitive.) - The word in the genitive case is being used as an adjective, describing an attribute or quality to the head noun.

It can be thought meanings of the specifying genitive in English book as a simple adjective modifying the head noun, but with stronger force and emphasis. If it can be turned into an attributive adjective.

Genitive. The cases are discussed with reference to: A. Basic function. Special constructions. Verbs governing the cases. Prepositions governing the cases (including the so-called adverbial and verbal prepositions) Remark: Many prepositions (в, за, на, но, etc.) have a variety of meanings.

This kind of the genitive case is called the specifying genitive. The more common meanings of the specifying genitive are the following:possession: The master's wife (=the master has a wife) called him the “Blessed Wolf” (Jack London, ), In the centre of the field (=the field has a centre) he dragged down (Jack London, ); subjective.

It is well documented that there is a one-to-many relationship between Arabic and English genitival constructions.

However, it is unclear whether, given this syntactic variation, such constructions show equivalence in semantic function.

For this purpose, a corpus-based contrastive analysis of these genitive constructions in a bilingual novel is carried out. The gift was not a book nor a rose. The gift was money. In Greek, the word money would be in the genitive case to show that it is specifying what the gift was.

It was a gift of money. To communicate a genitive in English, we use “of.”. New Testament Greek Syntax. The Genitive Case.

The genitive primarily functions adjectivally to limit (restrict, see Louw Linguistic Theory) a substantive by describing, defining or qualifying / modifying genitive also sometimes functions to express the idea of separation, point of departure, source, origin (ie.

the ablative use). The dative case (abbreviated dat, or sometimes d when it is a core argument) is a grammatical case used in some languages to indicate the recipient or beneficiary of an action, as in "Maria Jacobo potum dedit", Latin for "Maria gave Jacob a drink".

In this example, the dative marks what would be considered the indirect object of a verb in English. Sometimes the dative has functions unrelated. Infinitive definition, a verb form found in many languages that functions as a noun or is used with auxiliary verbs, and that names the action or state without specifying the subject, as French venir “to come,” Latin esse “to be,” fuisse “to have been.” See more.

Both in English and in Greek, with verbs of giving, showing, and telling, a direct often appears along with an indirect object. While the direct object is the person or thing directly receiving the action of the verb, the indirect object expresses the person or thing indirectly affected by or interested in the action.

Possessive adjectives are used to show ownership of an item or an idea. Possessive adjectives are very similar to possessive pronouns and the two are often confused. Take a look at these examples of possessive adjectives immediately followed by possessive pronouns used in a similar : Kenneth Beare.

Nominative. The cases are discussed with reference to: A. Basic function. Special constructions. Verbs governing the cases. Prepositions governing the cases (including the so-called adverbial and verbal prepositions). Remark: Many prepositions (в, за, на, но, etc.) have a variety of govern more than one case; this is discussed in detail in the "Prepositions" chapter.

used for specifying days and dates when something happens: E.g.: maanantaina, "on Monday"; kuudentena joulukuuta, "on the 6th of December". Finnish | Estonian: Limitative case: specifying a deadline: E.g.: 午後5時半までに (Gogo go-ji han made-ni) "by PM" Japanese: Temporal case: specifying a time.

This paper takes a corpus-driven approach to the Korean first person possessive pronoun nay with reference to its plural counterpart wuli. The examination of the frequent noun collocates of the two pronouns in Sejong Corpus reveals the close connection between nay and inalienable entities as well as persons lower than the speaker.

Meanwhile, wuli is strongly coupled with places or. Genitive variation in English: conceptual factors in synchronic and diachronic studies. Print book: EnglishView all --Establishing a criterion of 'sameness' for the s-genitive and the of-genitive --Categorical versus choice contexts --Genitive functions/meanings --Pronominal versus full NP possessors --Definiteness and reference.

In English grammar, an appositive is a noun, noun phrase, or series of nouns placed next to another word or phrase to identify or rename word "appositive" comes from the Latin for "to put near." Nonrestrictive appositives are usually set off by commas, parentheses, or appositive may be introduced by a word or phrase such as namely, for example, or that : Richard Nordquist.

The possessive can express different MEANINGS: POSSESSIVE GENITIVE. Its central use is to express possession: My uncle’s book. SUBJECTIVE GENITIVE. If the headword denotes an action, the genitive may denote the agent: His father’s consent.

OBJECTIVE GENITIVE. If the genitive indicates the object or receiver of the action: The prisoner’s. Specifying genitive – with this semantic type the noun in the genitive case form is used with specific reference: e.g. my neighbour’s son The relations between the noun in the genitive case form and its head-noun are various.

morphological change (as we will see below in section 4): for instance, the Old English noun that is reflected as modern book belonged to a class that ought to yield modern *beech as its (exceptional) plural, but this feature has been lost, so that the word now forms its plural regularly as books.

Rather less frequently, exceptional behaviour File Size: KB. Request PDF | Arabic and English genitive constructions: A corpus-based contrastive analysis of patterns and equivalence | It is well documented that there is a one-to-many relationship between.

The question of whether the genitive apostrophe came about as a result of English shifting away from being a heavily inflectional language (in which this punctuation mark stood in for certain now-discarded case endings) or whether it served as a substitution for part of the word his is an issue that might be referred to as grammatical, but.

1. Seems to confuse a literary convention with a grammatical one. Possibly even introduces theology into the grammar. 2. In most cases, the subjective produces the objective = a primacy of meaning, not an equative meaning.COVID Resources.

Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

I think you'll find it in many modern English grammars. After all, not all "of" uses are possessive, and used correctly the cases can distinguish two meanings: "A book of poety" is not possessive, while "a book of Tom's" is.

"A book of Shakespeare" is not the same as "A book of Shakespeare's." And certainly with pronouns there can be no argument.